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The group leaders have been studying the area for over 20 years and the walks are an opportunity to pass on the knowledge we have acquired to the group.  An important aim of the walks is to teach members how to read the landscape historically.

                                                                                
                                                                                 Knowle Hill Walke 1 -  boundaries, site of an ancient windmill,
                                                      medieval clayworkings, site of Ticknall's workhouse.
 

                                                                               

                                                                             Limeyards Walk - tracing the course of the 12th century leat.


Looking at ancient coalmining landscapes on the Southwood Estate.

                                                                                          

Walk in the Limeyards with the National Trust's East Midlands Archaeologist

Looking at village boundaries




Ticknall's 'Little Field' walk


Derby Hills - serious mud but no rain!


A 'local' member's view

'Being Ticknall born and bred, with a lifelong interest in local history, I was familiar with the route of the 'Little Field' walk.  The difference this time was being accompanied by two local historians (Sue and Janet), who interpreted this familiar landscape with such knowledge and enthusiasm, for example, the wide sweep entrance to Calke Park for teams of oxen, ancient boundaries and ridge and furrow.  I had never considered how these features had evolved, being created by man's past activities.  It was fascinating to learn how these came about, and the part they played in Ticknall's history and development.
A thoroughly enjoyable and enlightening experience both for more recent inhabitants of Ticknall and natives such as myself.  I now see this familiar landscape from a different perspective, and with even more appreciation.'



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